Muhammad Ali Research Paper

Black Power records at the National Archives related to Muhammad Ali consist of the court case (Clay v.

United States) relating to his refusal of induction for the Vietnam War draft.

He sought to raise public interest in his fights by reading childlike poetry and spouting self-descriptive phrases such as “float like a butterfly, sting like a bee.” He told the world that he was “the Greatest,” but the hard realities of boxing seemed to indicate otherwise.

As a result of his actions, boxing officials decided to punish Ali by stripping him of his titles and suspending him from the game of boxing.Over the course of three rounds, Ali landed more than 100 punches, scored four knockdowns, and was hit a total of three times.Ali’s triumph over Williams was succeeded by victories over war in Vietnam.In addition, he was known for his social message of black pride and black resistance to white domination and for refusing induction into the U. His final record of 56 wins and 5 losses with 37 knockouts has been matched by others, but the quality of his opponents and his overwhelming success during his prime placed him among boxing’s immortals.Cassius Marcellus Clay, Jr., grew up in the American South in a time of segregated public facilities.Triumphs over Floyd Patterson, George Chuvalo, Henry Cooper, Brian London, and Karl Mildenberger followed.On November 14, 1966, Ali fought Cleveland Williams.Muhammad Ali, original name Cassius Marcellus Clay, Jr., (born January 17, 1942, Louisville, Kentucky, U.S.—died June 3, 2016, Scottsdale, Arizona), American professional boxer and social activist.This refusal followed a blunt statement voiced by Ali 14 months earlier: “I ain’t got no quarrel with them Vietcong.” Many Americans vehemently condemned Ali’s stand.It came at a time when most people in the United States still supported the war in Southeast Asia.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

One thought on “Muhammad Ali Research Paper”