Research Proposal Steps

Many research proposals are too broad, so reflecting on your key research questions is a good way to make sure that your project is sufficiently narrow and feasible (i.e.one that is likely to be completed with the normal period for a MJur, MPhil or Ph D degree). Anticipated budget For further information on formatting your research proposal and the criteria for the review process please refer to the SPHCM Applicant Guidelines for Research Proposals.Applicants are still required to submit a detailed research proposal.

The proposal is the most important document that you submit as part of the application process.

Your methods may include visiting particular libraries or archives, field work or interviews. If your proposed research is library-based, you should explain where your key resources (e.g. You should therefore explain why your research is important (for example, by explaining how your research builds on and adds to the current state of knowledge in the field or by setting out reasons why it is timely to research your proposed topic). Bibliography The proposal should include a short bibliography identifying the most relevant works for your topic.

law reports, journal articles) are located (in the Law School’s library, Westlaw etc). We recognise that you are likely still developing your research topic.

Regardless of whether you are applying for the MJur, MPhil or Ph D programmes, your research proposal should normally include the following information: 1.

Title This is just a tentative title for your intended research.

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  1. This influence has mainly been via concepts he developed in particular historical studies that have been taken up as analytical tools; “governmentality” and ”biopower” are the most prominent of these.