Synthesising Drums

During the three years that Hammond manufactured this model, 1,069 units were shipped, but production was discontinued at the start of World War II.

In the 1940s and 1950s, before the popularization of electronic organs and the introductions of combo organs, manufacturers developed various portable monophonic electronic instruments with small keyboards.

In 1949, Japanese composer Minao Shibata discussed the concept of "a musical instrument with very high performance" that can "synthesize any kind of sound waves" and is "...operated very easily," predicting that with such an instrument, "..music scene will be changed drastically." After World War II, electronic music including electroacoustic music and musique concrète was created by contemporary composers, and numerous electronic music studios were established around the world, for example Studio for Electronic Music (WDR), and Studio di fonologia musicale di Radio Milano.

These studios were typically filled with electronic equipment including oscillators, filters, tape recorders, audio consoles etc., and the whole studio functioned as a sound synthesizer.

Synthesizers are used in genres such as pop, hip hop, metal, rock, dance, and contemporary classical music.

One of the earliest electric musical instruments, the Musical Telegraph, was invented in 1876 by American electrical engineer Elisha Gray.

In 1938, USSR engineer Yevgeny Murzin designed a compositional tool called ANS, one of the earliest real-time additive synthesizers using optoelectronics.

Although his idea of reconstructing a sound from its visible image was apparently simple, the instrument was not realized until 20 years later, in 1958, as Murzin was, "an engineer who worked in areas unrelated to music".

Synthesizers without built-in controllers are often called sound modules, and are controlled via USB, MIDI or CV/gate using a controller device, often a MIDI keyboard or other controller.In the 1980s, the invention of the relatively inexpensive Yamaha DX7 synth made digital synthesizers widely available.1980s pop and dance music often made heavy use of synthesizers.In the 1930s and 1940s, the basic elements required for the modern analog subtractive synthesizers — electronic oscillators, audio filters, envelope controllers, and various effects units — had already appeared and were utilized in several electronic instruments.The earliest polyphonic synthesizers were developed in Germany and the United States.In this video, Alex Ball takes a look at synthesizing drum sounds, using analog synth modules.Ball demonstrates creating drum patches with a 1978 Roland System 100m modular synthesizer – but you can use a similar approach with other types of subtractive synths.Gray also built a simple loudspeaker device into later models, consisting of a vibrating diaphragm in a magnetic field, to make the oscillator audible.This instrument was a remote electromechanical musical instrument that used telegraphy and electric buzzers that generated fixed timbre sound.The controllers were initially implemented as a multidimensional pressure keyboard in 1945, then changed to a group of dedicated controllers operated by left hand in 1948.It may have been similar to another electrostatic reed organ, the Orgatron, developed by Frederick Albert Hoschke in 1934 and then manufactured by Everett and Wurlitzer until 1961.

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